Nutrition When Quitting Smokeless Tobacco, Dip & Chew

Nutrition Of Quitting DipI’ve seen multiple stories today regarding “the fog”. As many of you are aware, the fog is nasty and can leave our bosses quite frustrated at our production. It also can lead to the demise of a quit if we allow our brains to think going back to nicotine is the solution.

During the initial days of a quit, we often tell new quitters to drink tons of water and cut back on their caffeine. We’ve never really dealt with the nutritional side of how to deal with quitting and I realized tonight that it is not a solution that many people have explored. I found a few sites, and I’m not a doctor. Hell, I didn’t even stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night. But nutrition is not something that gets talked about.

First of all, I used a list that was compiled at flowingfree.org. It talks about other vitamins and supplements that may be beneficial to quitting (but I really just wanted to focus on those associated with “the fog”).

Simply put, proteins should be key in your diet. Meats are heavy in all of the vitamins that are known to have “fog lifting” abilities. These vitamins stabilize your blood sugars, help repair brain function, and give you energy to keep you at your peak. Although found primarily in meats, you’d be surprised to find that these vitamins are in a lot of vegetables and fruits as well.

Smokers should up their vitamin C intake while quitting.
Smoking depletes the body of vitamin C.

Try to stay away from sugary foods. The spike in blood sugar can send you reeling into a crave.

Foods That Are Helpful While Quitting

Proteins and Whole Grains – maintain stable blood sugar levels. Include protein rich foods such as eggs, tofu, string cheese, yogurt, beans, or fish into your snacks and meals.

(Smoking Primarily) Vitamin C – Smoking depletes the body of vitamin C. The jury is out on whether chewing tobacco does the same.

Vitamins Helpful When Quitting Dip

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) – Most meat products like poultry, pork, liver, kidney, and fish are excellent sources of vitamin B1. Unrefined, unprocessed, fortified food: Enriched flours, fortified breads, cereals, and pasta are all good sources of vitamin B1. Fortified food has added vitamin B1 and can be easily absorbed by the body.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) – dairy products (such as milk, cheese and yogurt), eggs, enriched or fortified cereals and grains, meats, liver, dark greens (such as asparagus, broccoli, spinach and turnip greens), fish, poultry, and buckwheat.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) – Vitamin B3 (Niacin)-high protein content, such as meat, eggs, and peanuts. Other good sources of vitamin B3 equivalents, such as milk, actually provide more tryptophan than niacin. Mushrooms and greens are good vegetable sources.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) – Many fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are good sources of vitamin B6. Some ready-to-eat breakfast cereals are fortified with vitamin B6. Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts. Fish, beef, and turkey contain high amounts of vitamin B6.

B12 (Cobalmin) – Clams,, Beef, Turkey, Oysters,Chicken, Crab,Salmon,Ready-to-Eat Cereals.

Choline – Shrimp, Eggs, Scallops, Chicken, Turkey, Cod, Tuna, Salmon, Beef, Collard Greens

L-Glutamine – beef, chicken, fish, eggs, milk, dairy products, wheat, cabbage, beets, beans, spinach, and parsley. Small amounts of free L-glutamine are also found in vegetable juices. (WARNING-Check out the possible side effects of L-Glutamine when taken as a supplement.)

Omega 3 Fish Oils – Flax Seeds, Walnuts, Sardines, Salmon, Soybeans, Tofu, Shrimp, Brussels Sprouts, Cauliflower, Winter Squash

Herbs Helpful When Quitting Dip

Oats (Avena sativa)

Rhodiola (Rhodiala Rosea)

For additional reading, please check out the following:

NOTE: This piece written by KillTheCan.org forum member wastepanel

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